Save your digital photos, Part 3: Why you need to do it (Photo Reprise)

Okay, so Part 2 was a bit verbose. Sorry. I suppose you could say I am nothing if not thorough?

I warned my husband that it had gotten a bit long, and after he read it, his comment was: “You were right. It does make you sound a bit insane!”

To which, I replied: “Better insane than sorry.”

And I stand by that.

However, if you made it this far in the series, I want to remind you simply about why I posted that seemingly endless outline for my digital photo preservation strategy: to help you preserve your own digital memories.

And since they say that “a photo is worth 1000 words,” I thought I’d drive the point home by simply sharing a selection of digital memories that I personally wouldn’t want to see lost.

(All photos below are either from my own personal collection or those of my friends/family, used with permission.)

If this doesn’t impress upon you the reason I wrote Parts 1 & 2 — and why I want to burn the bottom-line concept of LOCKSS (lots of copies keeps stuff safe!) into your brain — I don’t know what will.

And, go:

grad1

Lisa

.

grad2

Gina

.

grad3

Sara

.

wed1

The Aisle

.

wed2

The Kiss

.

wed3

Out the Doors

.

wed4

Cakey Kiss

.

wed5

The Wind

.

fam1

The WHOLE family

.

fam2

Dancing with my 90-year-old grandfather (who died in 2008)

.

fam3

Seeing the house where grandpa was born (in Italy)

.

fam4

57 years and 7 kids later

.

travel1

Forum at Rome, Italy

.

travel2

Smoky Mountain Honeymoon

.

travel3

Erectheion at Athens, Greece

.

travel4

Cades Cove, TN

.

baby1

New Family

.

baby2

Meeting Mom and Dad

.

baby3

Day 1

.

All photographic moments that can never — NEVER — be replaced.

If that thought doesn’t make you want to make an active effort to preserve your digital memories (and the print ones, too), then no amount of words from me can help you.

Thanks to my family and friends who gave me permission to use their photos.

One response to “Save your digital photos, Part 3: Why you need to do it (Photo Reprise)

  1. Pingback: A rebuttal to HP’s “Scan and share children’s artwork” blog post | Glancing Backwards

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