Tag Archives: manuscripts

Revisiting old friends in the Archives

I got to revisit some “old friends” in the Archives at work today. These were old friends from the Dayton Metro Library, but they found me at my new job as an archivist at Wright State.

They weren’t living people or current friends; not really friends at all, if I’m being honest. But in a way, they felt like friends at the time, so I consider them that, still.

I’m talking about (long-dead) people whose papers I arranged & described. People who never knew me; who might not have even liked me (or I them) if we’d known each other in real life; but whom I hold in a special regard since I handled, (to some extent) read, and lovingly organized some of their most personal thoughts, little pieces of themselves committed preserved paper, and thereby history.

The first of the day today was David W. Schaeffer (whom you can learn more about in this biographical sketch I wrote about him in July 2012). A researcher, and relative of his, came to visit us today in the Archives from the Los Angeles area. She had found my blog post about him (the one linked above) last year, and we emailed back and forth a bit. I’m not sure how much help I could be, since basically all that I knew, I had poured into the biographical sketch already. But she wanted to meet me and see what we might have at the Wright State Archives that could help her during her research trip to Ohio. We talked about a few things, and I think she told me more about David than what I told her—for instance, that his middle name was Winters. The Schaeffers and Winters families were both early settlers of Germantown, so there seems to have been some connection there. After she left WSU, I believe she was on her way to Germantown. I’m not sure if that was the plan before she stopped in to see me, but I told her she really needed to check it out before she left the area (tomorrow being her last day in Ohio, she said). If nothing else, it would be a nice drive to Germantown at this time of year… (She had already visited the Dayton Metro Library and looked at David’s papers there.)

The second “old friend” that I ran into today at work was Horton Howard (read my biographical sketch of him from Aug 2012 on this blog), an early Quaker settler of Ohio—and sometimes doctor—whose daughter Sarah was married to Dayton canal engineer Samuel Forrer; all of these people (and many others) have papers in the Forrer-Peirce-Wood Collection at Dayton Metro Library, which I processed in 2011-2012.

Anyway. I ran into Horton while hunting around one of our storage locations for some Sanborn Maps. I did eventually find the map books, and nearby was part of our collection of rare medical books. A large book with the name “Howard” stamped on the spine caught my eye:

Howard's rare medical books at Wright State University Special Collections & Archives

Howard’s rare medical books at Wright State University Special Collections & Archives

And I thought, Oh that can’t be the same guy; that has to be a really common name, and I’m sure any number of “Howard”s have written medical books. Then I saw the book right next to it—about botanic medicine—and, recognizing it was a subject that Horton had in fact studied and written about, I pulled it off the shelf to look.

Sure enough, the title page said Horton Howard:

Horton Howard's Botanic Medicine, at Wright State Archives

Horton Howard’s Botanic Medicine, at Wright State Archives

So I checked the other one. Yep, Horton Howard:

Horton Howard's Domestic Medicine, at Wright State Archives

Horton Howard’s Domestic Medicine, at Wright State Archives

The publication dates through me for just a minute, knowing as I did that Horton died during the 1833 cholera epidemic in Columbus (as did his wife, a daughter, a son-in-law, and 2 grandchildren). But it turned out these were just reprints. One of them (I forget which one, sorry!) was like the seventh printing since 1832.

Now, I wasn’t QUITE as giddy about these finds as I might have been, since I had found the full text of the botanic medicine book online already and gleaned what I wanted to from it—-mostly from the fantastic preface that gives tons of info [block-quotes in the blog post] about Horton’s early life and medical knowledge (most of which was self-taught). But it was still pretty darn cool to see real life, 3-D copies of the works, complete with old school leather covers (which were in much better condition than I would have expected for 150+ year old books), hold them in my hands, and, I don’t know…..just remember good old Horton.

Just as an aside… I could visit Horton Howard and his family in one collection at the Wright State Archives anytime, but I already knew about that so it wasn’t a surprise: There are a few letters from Horton, his daughters Sarah and Mary, and a few other related people, in the Dustin/Dana Papers (MS-207). I have so far refused myself the indulgence of sitting down with them and just reading them all (even though there are only 10- just goes to show how busy I am)…but maybe one of these days! I’ve read so many pieces of that family’s story; it’s like found treasure when I stumble across pieces I didn’t even know where “missing” and are now found…

So, that’s my story for today. Hope you enjoyed it. Just goes to show, you never know when history will find you.

Historical Sketch: St. John’s Reformed Church in Germantown, Ohio

The village of Germantown, Ohio, was founded in 1804, when several German families from Pennsylvania settled there. These families were members of the Reformed and Lutheran churches. In 1809, the settlers built a single church to be shared by both congregations. This church, built of logs, was located near the present site of Emmanuel’s Evangelical Lutheran Church on Warren Street.

Initially these services were conducted by traveling ministers, but after a few years, both congregations had pastors in residence: Rev. Thomas Winters[1] for the Reformeds and Rev. John Caspar Dill for the Lutherans. The congregations shared the log church for 20 years, alternating Sunday services every other week—a Lutheran service one week, a Reformed service the next—although families of both denominations attended services every week.

In 1818, Philip Gunckel, the town proprietor, began building a large new brick church at the corner of Market and Walnut streets, on the property where St. John’s Reformed Church currently stands. He sold half of the church building to Reformed congregation and the other half to the Lutherans, for $600 each. The new church building was finally completed in 1828, and the two congregations worshiped together happily for two years in the new building. However, in 1830, a dispute arose between the Lutherans and Mr. Gunckel (a member of the Reformed church), and the Lutheran congregation returned to the log church. Thenceforth, the two congregations worshiped separately, although they shared a common burial ground until 1879.

Rev. Thomas Winters served the Reformed Church at Germantown for about 25 years before retiring in 1840, due to old age. He was succeeded by Rev. George Long, whose pastorate was rather tumultuous. Rev. Long wished to introduce new measures into the Reformed church, such as prayer meetings, and when this met with resistance, he was ousted. The Reformed congregation was then split between those who followed the Old Measures (and remained at the old church) and those who followed the New Measures (and worshiped in a new congregation led by Rev. Long).

The New Measures church was short-lived, however. About 1845, their church building burnt down a few years later and then Rev. Long departed. Rev. Thomas H. Winters led the New Measures from 1846 to 1848, and a new church was built. However, when the congregation could not pay for the new church, it was sold at auction. The New Measures congregation disbanded, with most of its members joining the Methodist or United Brethren churches.

The Old Measures congregation—which, after the dissolution of the New Measures congregation around 1848, could be simply known as the Reformed congregation again—had continued to worship at the brick church on the corner of Market and Walnut streets. They continued to use this building, which had been finished in 1828, until the year 1866. At that time, the old building was dismantled, primarily by the work of the men of the congregation, so that a new church could be built, partially on the same site and partially on new ground.

The new church took 13 years to complete, partially due to financial problems. After the first floor was completed, the project ran out of money. The congregation worshiped in this basement room in the meantime, still waiting the completion of the second floor audience room. After Rev. P. C. Prugh became the congregation’s pastor in 1876, he and church trustee Henry Hildabolt set out to solicit subscriptions for the remaining funds ($3,000) required to finish the church. In a short time, they received the necessary pledges, and construction continued. The new church was completed in 1879.

St. John's Church completed 1879

St. John’s Reformed Church completed in 1879 (From a postcard in the collection of the Germantown Historical Society. Used with permission.)

In 1891, the church trustees purchased a property on the southwest corner of Main and Gunckel streets to be used as the first parsonage. This was used until 1899, when a new parsonage property on the northwest corner of Gunckel and Walnut streets (the lot behind the church) was purchased.

Hildabolt donations, 1897

Records showing donations by church members, including Henry Hildabolt, to St. John’s Reformed Church in 1897 (St. John’s Reformed Church Records, MS-042, Dayton Metro Library)

On Sunday, April 7, 1907, a tornado struck, and the Reformed Church sustained serious damage, including being partially unroofed. The damage was so severe that the congregation decided it would be best to demolish the building and construct a new one on the same site.

St. Johns Church unroofed 1907

St. John’s Reformed Church, which was unroofed in the 1907 tornado (From a postcard in the collection of the Germantown Historical Society. Used with permission.)

The cornerstone for the new church was laid on November 3, 1907. Within the cornerstone were placed several items, including a list of church members (including 261 names), as well as several other lists and documents.[2] The grand opening of the new church was held in the Fall of 1908. The formal dedication was held on June 1, 1913, after all the construction costs were either paid or pledged. The mortgage burning was held on April 17, 1921, after the total construction costs ($37,000) were paid off.

St Johns 1908 church

The St. Johns Reformed Church built in 1908 (From a postcard in the collection of the Germantown Historical Society. Used with permission.)

The 1908 church building is still used by St. John’s congregation today, although the denomination itself has gone through some changes. In 1934, the Reformed and Evangelical churches merged nationally and became known as the Evangelical and Reformed Church. In 1957, the Evangelical & Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Church merged nationally and became known as the United Church of Christ.

St John's United Church of Christ Germantown

St John’s United Church of Christ in Germantown (Photo by the author, 4 Aug. 2012)

Therefore, the former St. John’s Reformed Church is now the St. John’s United Church of Christ. This congregation, over 200 years old, has worshiped at the southwest corner of Market and Walnut streets since 1828.


[1] Rev. Thomas Winters was the father of Valentine Winters, a prominent Dayton banker. Two of Rev. Thomas’s other sons, Thomas H. and David, also became ministers.

[2] For a more complete list of the contents of the 1907 cornerstone, see Annie Hildabolt’s Centennial History.

Bibliography

Becker, Carl M. The Village: A History of Germantown, Ohio, 1804-1976. Germantown, OH: Germantown Historical Society, 1981. Dayton Local History 977.172 B395V.

Hentz, John P. History of the Evangelical Lutheran Congregation of Germantown, Ohio, and Biographies of its Pastors and Founders. Dayton, OH: Christian Publishing House, 1882. Dayton Local History 284.1 H52.

Hildabolt, Annie. “Centennial History of St. John’s Reformed Church at Germantown, Ohio” (1914). St. John’s Reform Church, Germantown, Ohio, Records, 1843-1914 (MSS 25), Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, Ohio).

History of Montgomery County, Ohio. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882. Dayton Local History 977.172 H673A.

Kerne, Charme. History of Germantown [1804-1954]. [Germantown, OH?]: [Germantown Sesquicentennial Historical Committee?], 1954. Dayton Local History 977.172 K39H.

Montgomery County, Ohio, 1990: A History Written by the People of Montgomery County, Ohio. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Co., 1990. Dayton Local History 977.172 M78813.

St. John’s United Church of Christ. “About Us.” 21 Oct. 2008. Accessed 28 Aug. 2012. http://www.stjohnsuccgermantownohio.org/page2.html.

*****

This biographical sketch was originally written by Lisa P. Rickey in August 2012 for the St. John’s Reformed Church (Germantown, Ohio) Records (MS-042) finding aid at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio, 45402; phone (937) 496-8654.

Additional information about the sketch’s subject can be found in that collection. For more information about the manuscript collection’s contents, please see the original finding aid (which includes a name index), available in the Local History Room of the Dayton Metro Library or the OhioLINK EAD Repository entry.

Please contact the Dayton Metro Library or this blog’s author for more information about how to access the original finding aid or the manuscript collection.

Bio Sketch: Henry C. Schuberth (1848-1922), tobacco dealer in Miamisburg, Ohio

Henry Christian Schuberth was born June 7, 1848, in Wandsbek (near Hamburg), Germany, second of the nine children of William and Christina (Kahler) Schuberth.

Henry C. Schuberth's signature, 1887

Signature of Henry C. Schuberth from a September 1887 note (Schuberth Records, MS-033, Box 2, Folder 1)

Henry came to America when he was 3 years old. William and Christina Schuberth, with their four children, departed Hamburg, Germany, on November 17, 1851, aboard the ship Howard, and arrived in the port of New York in February 1852, after a voyage of 13 weeks.

The Schuberth family settled in Pennsylvania for two years before moving to Cincinnati in 1854, where William, a carpenter by trade, set up his business on the corner of Fifth and Elm Streets. William Schuberth later returned to Pennsylvania, settling at Unionville, near Pittsburgh, about 1870.

Henry C. Schuberth received a common education and worked as a clerk for a few years in both Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, as well as Cincinnati, Ohio, before moving to Miamisburg, Ohio, where he would spend the rest of his life.

Henry came to Miamisburg in 1865, when he was about 17 years old, to work as a clerk (for wages of $5 per month) in the tobacco business of his cousin Charles H. Spitzer. Spitzer was connected with the New York City tobacco dealing firm Bunzl & Dormitzer (Julius Bunzl and Henry Dormitzer).

When Spitzer removed to New York in 1873, Henry was given charge of Spitzer’s tobacco business at Miamisburg, including purchasing tobacco on joint account with Bunzl & Dormitzer. The firm traded several million pounds of tobacco per year at Miamisburg.

Bunzl and Dormitzer to H. C. Schuberth, 1876

Letter from Bunzl and Dormitzer, New York tobacco dealers, to Henry C. Schuberth, January 12, 1876. (Schuberth Records, MS-033, Box 2, Folder 3)

Henry continued to conduct business with the firm Bunzl & Dormitzer until the end of 1883, when the firm dissolved after 35 years due to the retirement of Mr. Dormitzer. On January 1, 1884, the firm reconvened as J. Bunzl & Sons, and consisting of Julius Bunzl and his three sons Victor, Gustave, and Ernest Bunzl. Henry continued to do business with J. Bunzl & Sons through at least 1889.

Henry C. Schuberth's letter books, 1873-1896

These letter books contain copies of Henry C. Schuberth’s outgoing business correspondence for his tobacco business, from 1873-1896. And even after 100+ years, the books still smell sweetly of tobacco leaves. (Schuberth Records, MS-033, Letter books 1-4)

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Schuberth letter book interior

Henry Schuberth’s copy of a letter he wrote to Bunzl and Dormitzer, tobacco dealers, in New York, ca. 1872. Schuberth’s copies of his correspondence are in 4 letter books with very thin paper. (Schuberth Records, MS-033, Letter book #1, page 74)

Henry conducted business with Joseph Bimberg, a tobacco dealer in Detroit, Michigan, from at least 1892 through 1897. Henry also conducted trade in the tobacco business with a number of other tobacco dealers in the Miami Valley, particularly Levi Baker of Brookville.

Henry’s tobacco warehouse was located between First Street (previously called Canal Street) and the Miami-Erie Canal, at the east end of Ferry Street (which used to dead-end before the canal).

H. C. Schuberth tobacco warehouse location

Map indicating the location of the H. C. Schuberth tobacco warehouse in Miamisburg in 1892 (from Sanborn Fire Insurance Map, 1892)

The spot where his tobacco warehouse once stood is now occupied by the continuation of Ferry Street between First and Second Streets.

HC Schuberth tobacco warehouse site

Ferry St bet First and Second (Miamisburg), former site of H. C. Schuberth tobacco warehouse (Photo by the author, 4 Aug. 2012)

Henry’s home, at 110 N. Main Street, was approximately 1 block away, where part of the Zee Motors lot is now.

HC Schuberth house site

NEC Main and Ferry (Miamisburg), former site of H. C. Schuberth house (110 N. Main) (Photo by the author, 4 Aug. 2012)

Henry C. Schuberth was widely recognized as being the oldest tobacco dealer in the Miami Valley at the time, when taking into account his years of continuous and actual service in the area’s tobacco industry.

Henry was a member of the Knights Templar, the Scottish Rite Freemasons, the Knights of Pythias, the International Order of Odd Fellows, and the Lutheran Church. In politics, he was a Republican.

On September 29, 1870, Henry C. Schuberth married a neighbor Sarah Oletta Shultz (1853-1937), daughter of Emanuel Shultz (1819-1912), a produce trader, tobacco dealer, banker, and later Congressman from Ohio’s 4th District.

Henry and Sarah had three children, all of whom were born in Miamisburg, Ohio:

  1. Clifford Manning Schuberth (born Apr. 15, 1876; died Mar. 13, 1960), who married Laura May Silberman (1875-1955), and had a daughter, Margaret Louise (Schuberth) Olinger (1903-1990);
  2. Mary A. Schuberth (born May 20, 1879; died 1923), who married Charles Henry Hall (1877-1951), and had a son, Henry Schuberth Hall (1902-1984); and
  3. Harry C. Schuberth (born Dec. 4, 1880; died 1954), who married Louise Victoria Kessel (1880-?), and had two daughters, Mary Oletha Schuberth and Virginia K. Schuberth.

Henry Christian Schuberth died on February 26, 1922, at his home in Miamisburg, Ohio, as a result of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was buried on March 1, 1922, at Hill Grove Cemetery in Miamisburg. His wife Sarah died May 27, 1937, in Miamisburg, and was buried next to him.

Henry C. Schuberth tombstone 1

Henry C. Schuberth tombstone in Hill Grove Cemetery (Photo by Mary Downing-Mahan, from Find-A-Grave. Used with permission.)

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Henry Schuberth tombstone 2

Henry C. Schuberth tombstone in Hill Grove Cemetery (Photo by Mary Downing-Mahan, from Find-A-Grave. Used with permission.)

Bibliography

Conover, Frank. Centennial Portrait and Biographical Record of the City of Dayton and Montgomery County, Ohio. [Chicago]: A. W. Bowen, 1897. Pages 1048-1049. Dayton Local History 977.172 C753C 1897.

History of Montgomery County, Ohio. Chicago: W. H. Beers & Co., 1882. Pages 422, 458. Dayton Local History 977.172 H673A.

LaMarco, Frances. “Howard. Hamburg, Germany, to New York, November 17, 1851.” Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild. Transcribed 25 July 2000. Accessed 24 July 2012, http://immigrantships.net/v3/1800v3/howard18511117.html.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953.” FamilySearch web site. Accessed 24 July 2012, http://www.familysearch.org.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Miamisburg, Ohio, 1886 & 1892. Accessed 24 July 2012, http://dmc.ohiolink.edu/oplinmap.htm.

“Schuberth, Henry C. (1848-1922).” Find A Grave. Accessed 24 July 2012, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=75055728.

U.S. Federal Census, 1860-1930, via Ancestry Library Edition.

When Tobacco was King and the Farmers Reigned. [Miamisburg, OH]: Miamisburg Historical Society, 2002. Pages 121-122. Dayton Local History 338.17371 W567 2002.

*****

This biographical sketch was originally written by Lisa P. Rickey in August 2012 for the Henry C. Schuberth Tobacco Business Records (MS-033) finding aid at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio, 45402; phone (937) 496-8654.

Additional information about the sketch’s subject can be found in that collection. For more information about the manuscript collection’s contents, please see the original finding aid (which includes a name index), available in the Local History Room of the Dayton Metro Library or the OhioLINK EAD Repository entry.

Please contact the Dayton Metro Library or this blog’s author for more information about how to access the original finding aid or the manuscript collection.

Bio Sketch: lawyer Frank Breene (1860-1925) & teacher Carrie Breene (1864-1944)

Frank S. Breene and Carrie A. Breene were the youngest children of William Gale Breene (~1820-1896), a Dayton tailor who was a native of Ireland, and his wife Margaret (Jernee) Breene (~1822-1895).

William and Margaret (Jernee) Breene had 10 children:

  1. Francis M. Breene (~1844-1847);
  2. Martha Jane Breene (~1846-1918), sometimes called Jennie, who married Joseph T. Patton (~1841-1900) and moved to Detroit, Michigan;
  3. William H. Breene (~1848-1901), an inspector in Dayton;
  4. John J. Breene (~1851-1906), who moved to Kansas;
  5. Mary Gale Breene (1853-1939), who never married, was a teacher and principal in Dayton public schools for many years;
  6. Margaret Breene (~1855-1892), who married James D. Loughridge (~1855-1910) and moved to Louisville, Kentucky;
  7. Emma Breene (~1855-1856);
  8. Charles L. G. Breene (1859-1943), who was a tailor in Dayton for many years;
  9. Frank Shuey Breene (1860-1925), a Dayton lawyer; and
  10. Carrie A. Breene (1864-1944), a Dayton teacher.

*****

Frank Shuey Breene was born November 20, 1860, in Dayton, Ohio. He graduated in 1879 or 1880 from Dayton’s Central High School and began training for the bar soon afterwards. He apprenticed in the law office of Marshall & Gottschall. In May 1883, Frank was admitted to the bar.

Frank Breene, ca. 1907

Frank Breene, ca. 1907 (Dayton Daily News, 18 Sept. 1907, pg. 4)

Frank practiced law in Dayton for more than 40 years. Early in his career, Frank was a justice of the peace in Dayton. He also served two terms as city solicitor from 1910 to 1914. In November 1924, he made an unsuccessful bid for common pleas court judge. In politics, Frank was a Democrat.

Near the end of his life, Frank was a partner in the firm Breene, Dwyer, and Finn (with Albert J. Dwyer and Samuel L. Finn), which had an office in the Mutual Home Building. Dwyer had been Frank’s assistant during his time as city solicitor, and Finn had studied law under both Breene and Dwyer.

Frank was a member of fraternal organizations including the Elks Lodge No. 58 and the Knights of Pythias, Iola Lodge. He was a member of the Dayton Bar Association, and, when the elite Dayton Lawyers’ Club was founded in 1909, Frank Breene was among its original directors.

Frank S. Breene was never married. For many years, he and his two unmarried sisters, teachers Mary and Carrie Breene, lived together at 740 Superior Avenue (a large lot on the southeast corner of Superior and Easton) in the Old Dayton View neighborhood. The home site is now a grassy lot next to an apartment complex (736 Superior).

Frank S. Breene died of liver cancer on May 1, 1925, at his home on Superior Street in Dayton, Ohio, after an illness of several months. He was buried on May 4, 1925, in Woodland Cemetery in Dayton.

Tombstone of Frank Breene, Woodland Cemetery

Tombstone of Frank Breene, Woodland Cemetery, Dayton (Photo by the author, 29 Aug. 2012)

*****

Carrie A. Breene was born October 22, 1864, in Dayton, Ohio. She graduated in 1883 or 1884 from Dayton’s Central High School. Her post-secondary education included the Dayton Normal School and the Columbia Teachers Colleges, as well as courses at Harvard University.

Carrie Breene, 1917

Carrie Breene, 1917 (Steele High School Annual, 1917, available in the Dayton Metro Library’s Local History Collection)

Carrie was a teacher in the Dayton public schools for 40 years. In 1884, she began teaching in one of the primary schools and continued in that position until 1898, when she became a teacher at Steele High School. Over the years, Carrie taught English, public speaking, history, and Latin. She retired in 1924 as one of the city’s best known public school teachers.

Carrie never married. She was was a member of the Young Woman’s Christian Association (YWCA), the Marlay Circle, the Woman’s Literary Club, and Westminster Presbyterian Church.

Carrie died of pneumonia on May 24, 1944, at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, Ohio. She was buried on May 27, 1944, in Woodland Cemetery in Dayton.

Carrie Breene tombstone, Woodland

Tombstone of Carrie Breene, Woodland Cemetery, Dayton (Photo by the author, 29 Aug. 2012)

Bibliography

Central High School. Brief History of the Alumni of Central High School, Dayton, Ohio. Dayton, OH: Alumni Association of the Central High School, 1887. Volume 3: pp. 2, 57.

Conover, Frank. Centennial Portrait and Biographical Record of the City of Dayton and Montgomery County, Ohio. [Chicago]: A. W. Bowen, 1897. Dayton Local History 977.172 C753C 1897.

Dalton, Curt. Portraits of Dayton. Dayton, OH: Asylum Graphics, 1993. Volume 1 & 2.

Dayton (OH) City Directories, 1886-1920. Dayton Metro Library.

“Dayton Deaths : Miss Carrie Breene.” Dayton Journal, 26 May 1944, p. 10.

Delta Kappa Gamma Society, Pi Chapter. Stories About Pioneer Women Teachers in Montgomery County, Ohio. Ohio: Delta Kappa Gamma Society, 1950. Dayton Local History B377172 D366S.

“Breene, Dwyer and Finn.” Official Annual Labor Review 2, no. 19 (1918). Accessed 26 July 2012, http://www.daytonhistorybooks.com/page/page/4478367.htm.

“Frank S. Breene Dies; Funeral is Set for Monday.” Dayton Journal, 2 May 1925, pp. 1-2.

Greer, David C. Sluff of History’s Boot Soles: An Anecdotal History of Dayton’s Bench and Bar. Wilmington, Ohio: Orange Frazer Press, 1996.

The Ohio Blue Book; or, Who’s Who in the Buckeye State: A Cyclopedia of Biography of Men and Women of Ohio. Toledo, OH: [s.n.], 1917.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953.” FamilySearch web site. Accessed 16 July 2012, http://www.familysearch.org.

Steele High School Annual, 1909-1925. Dayton Metro Library.

U.S. Federal Census, 1850-1940, via Ancestry Library Edition.

Woodland Cemetery & Arboretum Interment Database, accessed 7 June 2012, http://www.woodlandcemetery.org.

*****

This biographical sketch was originally written by Lisa P. Rickey in July 2012 for the Breene Family Papers (MS-030) finding aid at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio, 45402; phone (937) 496-8654.

Additional information about the sketch’s subject can be found in that collection. For more information about the manuscript collection’s contents, please see the original finding aid (which includes a name index), available in the Local History Room of the Dayton Metro Library or the OhioLINK EAD Repository entry.

Please contact the Dayton Metro Library or this blog’s author for more information about how to access the original finding aid or the manuscript collection.

Bio Sketch: Dr. Thomas A. McCann (1858-1943), homeopathic doctor in Dayton, Ohio

Thomas Addison McCann was born September 25, 1858, in Dresden, Muskingum County, Ohio, the eldest son of Thomas A. McCann (~1818-1883), a farmer and schoolteacher active in community government, and his wife Jane (McKee) McCann (~1826-1877).

Dr. Thomas A. McCann, ca. 1909

Dr. Thomas A. McCann, ca. 1909 (from the Dayton Daily News, 9 Apr. 1909, pg. 9 – view complete article)

As a boy, Thomas attended the schools near his father’s farm. As a young man, he attended Denison University.[1] He began his medical training at the University of Michigan, which he attended during the 1882-1883 school year.

After only one year at University of Michigan, Thomas apparently halted his formal education temporarily, probably due to family obligations. His mother had died in 1877, and in March 1883, his father died, leaving at least two children under the age of 16. Thomas may have been needed at home to care for his younger siblings.

In October 1889, Thomas returned to his formal studies, matriculating to the school of homeopathic medicine at Hahnemann University in Philadelphia. He graduated from Hahnemann with his M.D. on April 7, 1891.

Upon graduating from medical school in 1891, Dr. Thomas McCann moved to Dayton, Ohio, where his younger brother Benjamin F. McCann was an attorney.

According to Dayton city directory listings, Dr. Thomas McCann’s first residence and office was located at 133 N. Perry Street, during the years 1891-1892. From 1892 until 1899, Thomas lived and practiced medicine at 108 N. Ludlow Street. From 1899 until the early 1940s, Thomas had his office and residence in a duplex at 115/117 N. Perry Street. (With regard to this collection: volumes 1 and 2 were from Dr. McCann’s practice on Ludlow Street; volumes 3 and 4 were from the practice at 115 N. Perry.)

Thomas McCann’s decision to move from the location at 108 N. Ludlow to the larger accommodations 115/117 N. Perry Street probably resulted from changes in his domestic situation. For several years, Thomas’s brother Benjamin and sister Celestia lived with him at 108 N. Ludlow.[2] In 1899, he added a wife and mother-in-law to his household, not to mention the children he would soon have.

On February 21, 1899, Thomas A. McCann married Jeannette Kratochwill (1868-1954), daughter of Joseph and Harriet (Conard) Kratochwill. It is possible that Thomas may have met Jeanette through his medical practice; the records indicate that he attended to her in 1895-1896 (see volume 1, page 406).

Jeannette Kratochwill billing record, 1895-1896

Jeannette Kratochwill billing record, 1895-1896 (Dr. T. A. McCann Financial Records, MS-047, Dayton Metro Library, Vol. 1, page 406)

Thomas and Jeannette McCann had five children, all of whom were born in Dayton:

  1. Harriet K. McCann (born Feb. 26, 1900; died Mar. 10, 2000), who married George M. Roudebush and lived in Shaker Heights, Ohio;
  2. Maj. Thomas Addison McCann, III (born July 2, 1901; died May 10, 1980), who served in the U. S. Army;
  3. Jane McCann (born June 20, 1903; died Dec. 22 1952), who married Carl J. Linxweiler and lived in Oakwood;
  4. Richard Lee McCann (born Feb. 22, 1905; died Apr. 19, 1941), a Dayton attorney who died unmarried at age 36 as a result of heart trouble; and
  5. Joseph K. McCann (born Aug. 20, 1907; died Nov. 15, 1971), who was a clerk at Buckeye Iron and Brass Works in Dayton for several years.

Dr. Thomas A. McCann practiced homeopathic medicine in Dayton for approximately 50 years and was the personal physician of many prominent Daytonians, including James M. Cox and Charles F. Kettering. He was also a surgeon at Miami Valley Hospital for many years beginning in the early 1890s, shortly after it was founded.

J. M. Cox billing record, 1900

J. M. Cox billing record, 1900 (Dr. T. A. McCann Financial Records, MS-047, Dayton Metro Library, Vol. 3, Page 82)

In addition to the practice of medicine and surgery, Dr. McCann was active in several professional organizations and boards. He was a member of the Ohio state board of medical examiners for over 16 years. He was a member of the American Institute of Homeopathy, of which he was elected president in 1920. He was also a member of the Dayton Homeopathic Society, the Montgomery County Medical Society, and the Ohio State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He was also a member of the Board of Trustees of the New York Homeopathic College.

In 1926, Thomas McCann agreed to run as the Democratic candidate for Congress for Ohio’s Third District. He was defeated by the incumbent, Roy G. Fitzgerald.

Dr. McCann was an active member of the First Baptist Church in Dayton. He was also a member of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry. In his leisure time, Dr. McCann enjoyed going to Canada on hunting trips.[3]

Dr. Thomas A. McCann died on the evening of November 7, 1943, at the home of his daughter Jane in Oakwood, Ohio, after a two-year battle with prostate cancer. His wife Jeannette died on February 21, 1954. They are both buried in Woodland Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio.

McCann Family Plot, Woodland Cemetery

McCann Family Plot, Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio (Photo by the author, 3 June 2012)


[1] Thomas’s attendance at Denison is mentioned in multiple sources, including his obituaries; however, librarians in the Denison University Archives were unable to find any records of his attendance (Mary Prophet to Lisa Rickey, email, 9 July 2012).

[2] After Thomas McCann moved to Perry Street, his brother Benjamin began boarding at the YMCA; within a year of Thomas’s marriage, Benjamin married Laura Thresher and setup household in her home at 315 N. Robert Bouelvard.

[3] On one such hunting trip in February 1906, a member of McCann’s hunting party, Dayton mayor Charles A. Snyder, drowned.

Bibliography

Bradford, Thomas L. “McCann, T. Addison.” In Biographical Index of the Graduates of Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania and the Hahnemann College and Hospital of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: [published by subscription], 1918. Accessed 30 June 2012, http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001587030.

Brown, Harry W., ed. “T. A. McCann, M.D., Dayton” (pp. 304, 326). In Southern Ohio and Its Builders. [sine loco]: Southern Ohio Biographical Association, 1927.

Dayton (OH) City Directories, 1889-1943. Dayton Metro Library.

“Dr. Thomas A. McCann Dies; Rites Will be on Wednesday,” Dayton Daily News, 8 Nov. 1943, pp. 1-2.

“Dr. Thomas A. McCann, 85, Dies; Physician 50 Years,” Dayton Journal, 8 Nov. 1943, p. 1.

Hawker, Emma, graduate assistant at Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, email correspondence to Lisa Rickey, 3 July 2012.

Herbison, Matthew, archivist at Drexel University College of Medicine, email correspondence to Lisa Rickey, 30 June 2012.

Herzog, Lucy S. “Dr. Lester E. Siemon, of Cleveland, 1867-1943; Dr. Thomas A. McCann, of Dayton, 1858-1943; Dr. Hamilton Fiske Biggar [of Cleveland], 1839-1926.” In Ohio State Medical Journal 46 (1950): 464.

“Homeopathy’s Greatest Needs.” The Clinique 42, no. 6 (1921): 243-247. Accessed 12 July 2012, http://books.google.com/books?id=y7lXAAAAMAAJ.

“Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X89J-Y62 : accessed 12 July 2012), Thomas A. McCann, 1943.

Prophet, Mary Webb, librarian at Denison University, email correspondence to Lisa Rickey, 9 July 2012.

Rogers, L. D., ed. [Editorial and special contributions]. In The North American Journal of Homeopathy 68, no. 8 (Aug. 1920): 702-703. Accessed 12 July 2012, http://books.google.com/books?id=L_FXAAAAMAAJ.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Dayton, Ohio, 1897 & 1918. Accessed 12 July 2012, http://dmc.ohiolink.edu/oplinmap.htm.

Ullman, Dana. “Charles F. Kettering” (pp. 240-243). In The Homeopathic Revolution: Why Famous People and Cultural Heroes Choose Homeopathy. Berekeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2007. Accessed 12 July 2012, http://books.google.com/books?id=BXZlprZRTJoC.

U.S. Federal Census, 1860-1930, via Ancestry Library Edition.

Woodland Cemetery & Arboretum Interment Database. Accessed 7 June 2012, http://www.woodlandcemetery.org.

*****

This biographical sketch was originally written by Lisa P. Rickey in July 2012 for the Dr. Thomas A. McCann Financial Records (MS-047) finding aid at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio, 45402; phone (937) 496-8654.

Additional information about the sketch’s subject can be found in that collection. For more information about the manuscript collection’s contents, please see the original finding aid (which includes a name index), available in the Local History Room of the Dayton Metro Library or the OhioLINK EAD Repository entry.

Please contact the Dayton Metro Library or this blog’s author for more information about how to access the original finding aid or the manuscript collection.

Bio Sketch: Henry Hildabolt (1826-1902), cabinetmaker and undertaker in Germantown, Ohio

Henry Hildabolt was born August 29, 1826, in Heimershausen (near Naumburg and Kassel in Hesse), Germany.[1] Henry was the seventh child (and second son) out of the 8 children of John Hellabold (1789-1834) and his wife Catharine Elizabeth Nelke.[2] The other children of John and Catharine Hellabold were: Catherine Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Magdalena, Ann Catherine, Adam, Maria, and Andrew. John Hellabold made a comfortable living and was active in the Reformed Church.

Henry Hildabolt (1826-1902)

Henry Hildabolt (1826-1902) (Photo from A Sketch of the Life and Death of Henry Hildabolt, with Letters and Papers received by the Family (Dayton, OH: United Brethren Publishing House, 1902))

In May 1834, John Hellabold and his family, including 7-year-old Henry, departed Bremen, Germany, aboard the steamship Isabella, and after 52 days at sea, arrived at the port of New York on July 4, 1834. They traveled west to Cincinnati, where they sold two shotguns to pay the canal fare to Miamisburg. They sold some linen in order to pay a man to take them by wagon from Miamisburg to Sunbury, near Germantown.

Less than two months after the family arrived in Sunbury, Henry’s father John Hellabold became ill and died. This presented the family with great hardship and the need to seek outside employment or apprenticeships. Due to the circumstances, the children received little formal education after arriving in America, although they had attended school in Germany. Consequently, Henry had but a few years of regular schooling, although he continued to attend Sunday school.

At the age of 8, Henry’s mother placed him with another family, so that he could learn a trade, although she visited him often. He first went to live in the home of a blacksmith, but as he was not treated well there, he ran away, back to his mother. Then his mother placed him in the home of John D. Gunckel (of Germantown), where he was treated as a son. Henry was meant to stay with Mr. Gunckel until he reached adulthood, but when he was 14 years old, he convinced Mr. Gunckel to let him learn a trade.

Therefore, Henry went to live and apprentice with a local cabinetmaker named Berryman G. Hawkins. After 5 years of learning the cabinetmaking trade with Mr. Hawkins, Henry set out on his own at the age of 19. He traveled to find work and lived for a year in Goshen, Indiana. Henry soon returned to Germantown, where he was hired by Mr. Hawkins, making cabinets, coffins, and furniture.

Henry became a citizen of the United States at the age of 21, being naturalized on September 28, 1847, at Eaton, Ohio. After acquiring his citizenship, he took great interest in all elections and political issues. He was a Republican and supported the Union during the Civil War. (Although he was disqualified from Civil War service based on his age, he was active in helping to fulfill the draft quotas.)

Henry Hildabolt's Day Book, May 1852

Henry Hildabolt’s Day Book, May 1852 (Dayton Metro Library, MS-044, Box 1, Folder 1)

During the summer of 1858, Mr. Hawkins wished to retire and invited Henry to buy out his furniture-making and undertaking business. Henry agreed, purchasing and taking over the business at the end of August. Henry performed his first duties as an undertaker on August 29, for a child named Pence; the funeral cost $6. His next undertaking call was on August 31 for Mrs. Peter Shaeffer; the total fees for the funeral and coffin were $12.

Henry Hildabolt's Ledger (#1), 1858

Henry Hildabolt’s Ledger (#1), 1858 (Dayton Metro Library, MS-044, Box 1, Folder 4, Page 2)

On November 18, 1849, in Montgomery County, Ohio, Henry married Sarah Barnhart (born July 20, 1828), daughter of John and Christine Barnhart. By 1855, the young couple had saved enough money to purchase a house and lot on the southeast corner of Gunckle and Plum streets in Germantown, where they lived until their deaths.[3]

Henry Hildabolt's house

Henry Hildabolt’s house in Germantown (photo by the author, 4 Aug. 2012)

Henry and Sarah had 8 children:

  1. John A. Hildabolt (born Dec. 28, 1850; died Dec. 9, 1918);
  2. Ida Clementine Hildabolt (born Nov. 13, 1855; died May 28, 1931), who married Charles F. Huber (1846-1923);
  3. Charles W. Hildabolt (born Sept. 23, 1857; died Mar. 25, 1933), who married Emma C. Morningstar (1860-1934);
  4. Collin Lincoln Hildabolt (born Dec. 3, 1859; died Nov. 12, 1936), who married Harriet Bell Becker (1864-1941);
  5. Laura O. Hildabolt (born June 10, 1863; died Nov. 3, 1938), who married Frederick Kohnle (1860-1944);
  6. Orion F. Hildabolt (born about July 1865; died Feb. 28, 1866);
  7. Annie M. Hildabolt (born June 10, 1867; died Feb. 7, 1947); and
  8. Chloe Hildabolt (born Aug. 6, 1869; died June 17, 1940).

Although his beginnings were humble, Henry became quite successful and amassed a small fortune. From 1858 through the end of 1883, Henry Hildabolt had buried 1,358 people in Germantown and the surrounding area. He continued to deal in furniture as well.

Stamp for H. Hildabolt Undertaker and Dealer in Furniture

Stamp for H. Hildabolt Undertaker and Dealer in Furniture, Germantown, Ohio, ca. 1862-1883 (Dayton Metro Library, MS-044, Ledger #2, inside cover)

.

Stationery for Henry Hildabolt, Undertaker and Furniture Dealer, 1875

Stationery for Henry Hildabolt, Undertaker and Furniture Dealer, 1875 (Dayton Metro Library, MS-044, Box 1, Folder 3)

On January 1, 1884, Henry made his son John a formal partner in the business, thenceforth called H. Hildabolt & Son, with Henry receiving 2/3 of the business’s profits and John receiving 1/3. From 1884 to 1902, H. Hildabolt & Son buried another 1,017 more people, for a total of 2,375 burials during Henry’s 44 years in the undertaking business. Henry did not retire until just a few weeks before his death, at which time the business became J. A. Hildabolt & Brother, operated by brothers John and Collin.

Partnership of Henry Hildabolt and John Hildabolt, 1884

Partnership of Henry Hildabolt and John Hildabolt, 1884 (Dayton Metro Library, MS-044, Ledger #3, page 1)

.

H. Hildabolt & Son bed

H. Hildabolt & Son bed at the Germantown Historical Society (photo by the author, 4 Aug. 2012)

In addition to his dedication to his business, Henry was active member and generous supporter of the St. John’s Reformed Church at Germantown, where he also served as a trustee and Sunday school superintendent for many years. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Friendship Lodge No. 21, from 1848 until his death.

Henry Hildabolt died on January 25, 1902, in Germantown, Ohio, and was buried in the Germantown Cemetery. His wife Sarah died July 24, 1910, and was buried beside him.

Tombstone of Henry Hildabolt and his wife Sarah, Germantown Cemetery

Tombstone of Henry Hildabolt and his wife Sarah, Germantown Cemetery (photo by the author, 4 Aug. 2012)


[1] The Historical Society of Germantown consistently refers to him as “John Henry Hildabolt.” However, all other records, including the record of his birth (A Sketch of the Life and Death of Henry Hildabolt, p. 7) simply call him “Henry.” Heimershausen is located near the towns of Naumburg and Kassel, in the state of Hesse, Germany.

[2] The German spelling of the family name was “Hellabold” or “Hoellebold.” All references to Henry’s father use one of these German spellings, while all references to Henry and his family in the United States use the spelling “Hildabolt.”

[3] Henry Hildabolt’s house, now addressed 104 S. Plum Street, still exists and is a private residence.

*****

Bibliography

Ettel, Dorothy. “Hildabolt” [research notes]. Historical Society of Germantown (Germantown, Ohio). Accessed 4 Aug. 2012.

Hildabolt, Annie. “Centennial History of St. John’s Reformed Church at Germantown, Ohio” (1914). St. John’s Reform Church, Germantown, Ohio, Records, 1843-1914 (MSS 25). Ohio Historical Society (Columbus, Ohio).

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994.” FamilySearch web site. Accessed 26 Aug. 2012, http://www.familysearch.org.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953.” FamilySearch web site. Accessed 16 July 2012, http://www.familysearch.org.

“Pioneer Citizen Passed to His Reward.” Germantown Press, 30 Jan. 1902. In Dorothy Ettel, “Hildabolt” [research notes].

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Germantown, Ohio, 1921. Accessed 6 Aug. 2012, http://dmc.ohiolink.edu/oplinmap.htm.

“Self-Guided Tour of Historic Germantown, Ohio” (brochure). [Germantown, OH]: Historical Society of Germantown, [2012?].

A Sketch of the Life and Death of Henry Hildabolt, with Letters and Papers received by the Family. Dayton, OH: United Brethren Publishing House, 1902.

U.S. Federal Census, 1860-1940, via Ancestry Library Edition.

*****

This biographical sketch was originally written by Lisa P. Rickey in August 2012 for the Henry Hildabolt Cabinetmaker & Undertaker Business Records (MS-044) finding aid at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio, 45402; phone (937) 496-8654.

Additional information about the sketch’s subject can be found in that collection. For more information about the manuscript collection’s contents, please see the original finding aid available in the Local History Room of the Dayton Metro Library or the OhioLINK EAD Repository entry.

Please contact the Dayton Metro Library or this blog’s author for more information about how to access the original finding aid or the manuscript collection.

Bio Sketch: Jonathan Harshman Winters (1834-1915), banker in Dayton, Ohio

Jonathan Harshman Winters, I, was born October 21, 1834, in Dayton, Ohio, the fourth child (and eldest son) out of the 11 children of Valentine Winters (1807-1890) and his wife Catherine Harshman (1810-1882). He was named after his grandfather, Jonathan Harshman, Sr. Valentine Winters and his son Jonathan were prominent Dayton bankers.

Jonathan H. Winters (1834-1915)

Jonathan H. Winters (1834-1915), from the Dayton Daily News, 4 June 1915, pg. J5.

Jonathan attended local Dayton schools. Then, in 1851, he attended the Flushing Institute, a preparatory school in Long Island, New York. In 1852-1853, he studied at “the College Hill university” (Farmer’s College) in Cincinnati.

In 1853 or 1854, Jonathan became an assistant teller and messenger at the Dayton Exchange Bank, which was controlled by his father Valentine Winters, his uncle Jonathan Harshman, Jr., his brother-in-law Robert R. Dickey, and James R. Young. Within a few years, Harshman, Dickey, and Young had all withdrawn from the Exchange Bank. In 1857, Valentine Winters made his son Jonathan a partner (one-third interest) in the bank, which was then known as V. Winters & Son.

The same year that he became a partner in his father’s bank, Jonathan H. Winters married Susan Louella Bates on June 9, 1857, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Susan was born September 16, 1837, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the eldest daughter of Richard Bates (1808-1855) and his wife Nancy Trotter (1814-1870).

Susan L. (Bates) Winters

Susan L. (Bates) Winters (1837-1910), portrait taken in 1891 by Appleton (Winters Papers, 4:3, Photo # 02, Dayton Metro Library)

The Jonathan H. Winters family resided from at least the 1860s until about 1899 at 115 W. Third Street (north side of Third between Wilkinson and Ludlow), across the street from Jonathan’s father Valentine Winters’ large mansion at 130 W. Third Street. The Valentine Winters home became the site of the Women’s Christian Association in 1891 [dedicated 31 Jan. 1892, see MS-038, 4:1, p. 107].

Jonathan H. Winters' home, 1927

Jonathan H. Winters’ home (on the right), 115 W. Third St. in 1927 (Lutzenberger Photo # 0174, Dayton Metro Library)

A new YMCA was built at the northwest corner of Third and Ludlow in 1908, and the YMCA eventually purchased the J. H. Winters house next-door to be used as the Boys’ Building. The site is currently [2012] part of a Dayton municipal parking garage. About 1899, the Jonathan and Susan Winters moved to 137 W. First Street (northeast corner First and Wilkinson), where they lived until their deaths. The site is now a parking lot.

Jonathan Harshman Winters, I, and Susan Louella (Bates) Winters) had three children, all of whom were born in Dayton, Ohio:

  1. Louella Winters (born Sept. 22, 1858; died Aug. 13, 1940), who married Allen E. Thomas (1855-1910) in 1884 and had several children;
  2. Clara Winters (born Mar. 26, 1861; died Apr. 13, 1939), who never married; and
  3. Valentine Winters, II (born June 9, 1866; died Oct. 8, 1943), who married Helen Wood Clegg (1867-1938) in 1889 and had one son, Jonathan Harshman Winters, II (1898-1975).

On January 1, 1882, the V. Winters & Son Bank became the Winters National Bank, with Jonathan H. Winters as its president. With the exception of one year, Jonathan was the active head of the Winters National Bank for 31 years, from its inception on January 1, 1882, until he stepped down as president on January 1, 1913. However, he remained vice president until his death. Winters National Bank was located on the northeast corner of Third and Main Streets.

Callahan Building, ca. 1917

Callahan Building, northeast corner Third and Main streets, where the Winters National Bank was located for a number of years. Photo circa 1917. (Lutzenberger Photograph # 0265A, Dayton Metro Library)

The one year in which Jonathan H. Winters did not serve as active head of the Winters National Bank was from August 1882 to August 1883. During that time, Jonathan, his wife, and his three children traveled extensively throughout Asia, the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Europe. While Jonathan and his family were “globe trotting,” as he called it, his father Valentine acted as head of the Winters National Bank.

Tokyo postcard, 1882

One of many postcards collected by J. H. Winters during his world tour from 1882-1883. (Winters Papers, 2:5, Dayton Metro Library)

In addition to his interest in the banking industry, Jonathan H. Winters also held stock in the Dayton and Western Traction Company, the Dayton and Troy Traction Company, and other corporations.

Although Jonathan H. Winters was interested in civic and community affairs, he preferred the company of his family and the books in his large library over companionship from social clubs or organizations.

Susan L. Winters was actively involved in the Women’s Christian Association (WCA). She and her mother Nancy (Trotter) Bates were among its organizers in 1870, and Susan Winters was its first president. Susan was also among the founders (and a generous donor to the construction fund) of the Dayton Widows’ Home, which was built on Findlay Street in 1883 and maintained by the WCA.

When Miami Valley Hospital decided to remove from its location on Fourth Street to its present location near Apple Street, Susan Winters has been credited with having donated the land for the hospital.[1]

Jonathan and Susan Winters were members of the Third Street Presbyterian Church in Dayton. Susan taught a large Sunday school class for adults there for a number of years.

Susan L. (Bates) Winters died of heart disease on September 9, 1910, at her home, 137 W. First Street, Dayton, Ohio. She was 72 years old.

On June 4, 1915, Jonathan Harshman Winters, I, died in Dayton, as a result of pneumonia contracted during a lengthy road trip in inclement weather the previous week. He was 80 years old.

Jonathan H. Winters and his wife Susan L. Winters are buried in Woodland Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio.

Jonathan and Susan Winters grave

Jonathan and Susan Winters grave, Woodland Cemetery (Photo by the author, 29 Aug. 2012)


[1] This was stated in Susan’s obituary. However, Mark Bernstein’s book Miami Valley Hospital: A Centennial History (1990) names “Clara Winters” (the name of Jonathan and Susan’s daughter) as the land donor (pp. 18-19).

Bibliography

Bernstein, Mark. Miami Valley Hospital: A Centennial History. [Dayton, OH]: Miami Valley Hospital, 1990.

Dayton (OH) City Directories, 1856-1916. Dayton Metro Library.

Dayton Widows’ Home. “About Widows Home – Our History.” Accessed 11 July 2012, http://www.widowshome.org/about-us.

“Death Beckons Mrs. Winters.” Dayton Journal, 10 Sept. 1910, p. 9.

“Jonathan H. Winters, Pioneer Banker, Dies.” Dayton Daily News, 4 June 1915, p. J-5.

“Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images. Accessed 11 July 2012, at FamilySearch, http://www.familysearch.org.

“Prominent Dayton Banker Succumbs to Pneumonia.” Dayton Journal, 5 Jun 1915, p. 8.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Dayton, Ohio, 1897 & 1918. Accessed 19 July 2012, http://dmc.ohiolink.edu/oplinmap.htm.

Winters, Jonathan H. A Sketch of the Winters Family. Dayton, OH: United Brethren Publishing House, 1889.

Winters, Susan L. [Winters family genealogy notes]. Winters Collection (MS-038), 4:2, Dayton Metro Library (Dayton, Ohio).

Woodland Cemetery & Arboretum Interment Database. Accessed 11 July 2012, http://www.woodlandcemetery.org.

*****

This biographical sketch was originally written by Lisa P. Rickey in July 2012 for the Jonathan H. & Susan L. (Bates) Winters Papers (MS-038) finding aid at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio, 45402; phone (937) 496-8654.

Additional information about the sketch’s subject can be found in that collection. For more information about the manuscript collection’s contents, please see the original finding aid available in the Local History Room of the Dayton Metro Library or the OhioLINK EAD Repository entry.

Please contact the Dayton Metro Library or this blog’s author for more information about how to access the original finding aid or the manuscript collection.